Freedom movie – Freedom Of Information http://freedom-of-information.info/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 07:44:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://freedom-of-information.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/favicon.png Freedom movie – Freedom Of Information http://freedom-of-information.info/ 32 32 Cliffs of Freedom movie set during Greek Revolution streaming on major platforms https://freedom-of-information.info/cliffs-of-freedom-movie-set-during-greek-revolution-streaming-on-major-platforms/ https://freedom-of-information.info/cliffs-of-freedom-movie-set-during-greek-revolution-streaming-on-major-platforms/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/cliffs-of-freedom-movie-set-during-greek-revolution-streaming-on-major-platforms/ A still from the film The Cliffs of Liberty. Credit: Hellenic National Society Cliffs of Freedom, the historical drama set during Greece’s War of Independence, will air on major platforms from September 13, 2021, the National Hellenic Society (NHS) has announced. In a NHS statement, which owns all the rights to the film, said the […]]]>

A still from the film The Cliffs of Liberty. Credit: Hellenic National Society

Cliffs of Freedom, the historical drama set during Greece’s War of Independence, will air on major platforms from September 13, 2021, the National Hellenic Society (NHS) has announced.

In a NHS statement, which owns all the rights to the film, said the release on Amazon Prime, Apple and Google Play “will celebrate the bicentenary of Greece’s War of Independence.”

The story of Cliffs of Freedom takes place in Valtetsi, a small village in Arcadia in the Peloponnese in Greece. It is based on and inspired by a novel written by Marianne Metropoulos, Fille du Destin. The novel served as a springboard for the film produced by Marianne and Dean Metropoulos with Marianne as co-writer of the screenplay.

Look at the cliffs of liberty on Apple tv and Amazon prime.

Movie Cliff sof Freedom Watch Online Streaming Now

Marianne and Dean Metropoulos are members of the NHS, and as Drake Behrakis, chairman of the NHS board, told the Greek Reporter, the NHS felt that because “there are a lot of great cultural and historical themes in the film ”, the organization decided to buy all the rights. .

The Cliffs of Liberty showcase Greece’s War of Independence

“While we don’t expect to make any money from the film, we do think we can use it as an example to show the importance of the Greek War of Independence and talk about different themes in the film that resonate with it. a 21st century audience, ”Behrakis said. .

The film is an amalgamation of stories, narratives and events that took place during the Greek War of Independence. The lives, struggles, sacrifices and saga of the Greeks are brilliantly displayed, symbolic of the resilience, determination and courage of the Greek people determined to be free.

Their deep faith, values ​​and love of family, culture and heritage marks the first time their story has been shown on the big screen in epic form. The film’s production values, acting, score and caliber of the cast and crew created a film that captivated audiences.

Behrakis is hoping the film could follow on from the NHS ‘successful collaboration with National Geographic in the series, The Greek Guide to Greatness.

This series “was very critical” in promoting ancient Greek culture to a wider audience, says Behrakis. “He took major themes such as athletics, poetry, theater, democracy, everything that originated in ancient Greece, and showed how important they are still in today’s society. . “

Cliffs of Freedom, which centers on an unfortunate love story between a beautiful young girl from a Greek village that takes place at the start of the Revolutionary War in Greece, “is what we are trying to do as an organization. . To keep these messages alive. To keep the Greek diaspora engaged.

Inspiring stories

Behrakis, a second generation Greek, tells Greek Reporter that there are several stories in the film that he found inspiring. It highlights the scene towards the end of the film when Theodoros Kolokotronis, the Greek revolutionary leader, came with his rebels to liberate the Peloponnese. He is seen speaking to the people and inspiring them to fight for their freedom against the Ottoman Turks.

“I know who Kolokotronis was and how important he was, but it was the first time in a real movie to see him and realize what he meant to Greece. It was a moving experience for me. Wow, I thought, I actually see this person I’ve read so much about – seeing him live in a movie, ”Behrakis said.

He adds that “the more films we can include that showcase Greece and resonate with Greek history and culture among the general public, the better”.

The film is also available in theaters. More information on how to organize a special screening at a local theater, please contact the NHS.

The National Hellenic Society (NHS) is a nonprofit foundation made up of a Who’s Who of visionaries, philanthropists and leaders who celebrate, share and transmit Hellenic heritage in America.

NHS programs include its signature program, Heritage Greece, which reconnected and sponsored more than 500 university-aged Greek-born students in a life-changing experience hosted by the American College of Greece.

Look at the cliffs of liberty on Apple tv and Amazon prime.


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Hill of Freedom – Film Review https://freedom-of-information.info/hill-of-freedom-film-review/ https://freedom-of-information.info/hill-of-freedom-film-review/#respond Fri, 12 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/hill-of-freedom-film-review/ Under the direction of prolific South Korean director Hong, Hill of Liberty is by turns charming, playful humorous and gently melancholy. In other words, it’s an instantly welcome cinematic release, and one that couldn’t have come at a better time – even though it originally came out six years ago. The plot is simple but […]]]>

Under the direction of prolific South Korean director Hong, Hill of Liberty is by turns charming, playful humorous and gently melancholy. In other words, it’s an instantly welcome cinematic release, and one that couldn’t have come at a better time – even though it originally came out six years ago.

The plot is simple but ingenious. A woman, Kwon (Seo), retrieves a mysterious bundle of undated letters from a school somewhere in Seoul. She stumbles down the stairs and the missives fall from her hands and scatter on the completely useless floor. She later begins to read them, resulting in a story unfolding in flashbacks necessitated by the chronological mess of the correspondence.

native English-speaking Japanese Mori (Kase, from Takeshi Kitano’s Contempt) arrives in the district of Kwon. In love with the past and seeking to find himself, he spends his days alternately looking for Kwon and sitting alone, reading in a nearby café. Director Hong drops clues here and there – the book Mori is so engrossed in is titled “Time” – but the overall tone is less of a clever mystery and more of a mundane conundrum. In addition to the puzzle, Young-sun (Moon), an affectionate waitress with whom Mori begins an attempt at love, and a comically rowdy neighbor who repeatedly tries to have fun with Mori. It’s pretty much everything as the story goes, but it all sticks in your mind nonetheless, a dreamlike slice of sublime romantic slippage.

Hong has made eight more films since Hill of Libertydebut in 2014 at the Venice Film Festival. He’s definitely a niche writer, working as he does in the shadow of his better-known contemporaries (in the West), such as Oscar-winning Bong Joon-ho and genre favorites Park Chan-wook and Kim. Jee-woon. But while this triad regularly employs outrageous and often extreme storylines and manic camera work to assault audiences, Hong’s films are more frequently compared in terms of structure and tone to those of the late French national treasure Alain Resnais (Last year in Marienbad). The two filmmakers delve into the mysteries of time, memory, and perception, resulting in films that can appear introspective on an almost granular level in their meditative examinations of the inherent weaknesses in human connections. It may sound like a terribly serious art-house navel-gazing, but ultimately Hill of Liberty is surprisingly satisfying in its sheer banality – albeit abjectly disjointed – fishy out of water.

Hill of Liberty is currently available as a virtual cinema version at local arthouse theaters. Choose from:

• Violet Crown Cinema (Tickets here).


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Shadows of Freedom – Film review https://freedom-of-information.info/shadows-of-freedom-film-review/ https://freedom-of-information.info/shadows-of-freedom-film-review/#respond Fri, 12 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/shadows-of-freedom-film-review/ Most of the story is forgotten. Even if recorded, it slips out of the primary narrative, out of textbooks, eclipsed. That is why Shadows of freedom begins with a three-minute story of the invasion of France and the creation of the Vichy Republic. Why? Because, even if Vichy France is a punchline for American politicians, […]]]>

Most of the story is forgotten. Even if recorded, it slips out of the primary narrative, out of textbooks, eclipsed. That is why Shadows of freedom begins with a three-minute story of the invasion of France and the creation of the Vichy Republic. Why? Because, even if Vichy France is a punchline for American politicians, most Americans know nothing about it. Further than that: Most of them have no idea that D-Day was not the first time the Allies launched a coordinated attack on Nazi-held ground, because they never heard talk about Operation Torch – a complete invasion of French Algiers in November 1942. Also, the chances that they have any idea that they were aided in their efforts by a band of 388 resistance fighters – many young, Jewish or socialists – and more particularly the French Jewish Resistance, led by a young brand called José Aboulker, working with the Free French Army.

Amos Carlen and Aline Robichaud’s simple and fascinating documentary on this crucial military operation (no torch, no beach to launch Operation Husky to take Sicily, no road to Rome or Berlin) is often breathless, having to crowd a huge amount in 65 minutes. It’s also clear that a Rubicon documentary was crossed over in regards to WWII – there are fewer and fewer surviving veterans of the conflict to interview – so they build the story through a combination of documents. archives, animated reconstructions and conversations with academics and historians.

Documentary makers are a bit trapped in the context. They spend so much time explaining the background to Torch that it takes them half an hour to get to the real flesh of the story – Aboulker and his friends secretly launching a resistance force out of an Algerian gymnasium, and stumbling accidentally to aid Torch’s forces. It would be less of a problem if the movie hadn’t been 65 minutes long, but it’s a forgivable flaw as most people will have no idea.

Shadows of freedom often looks more like a making-of for a different movie. If Steven Spielberg had filmed the story of the Algerian resistance in the early 2000s, when extravagant and elaborate DVD extras were all the rage, it would fit perfectly in a three-disc edition. His linear approach is both informative and analytical, and Aboulker inevitably becomes the most central figure as he has given the most in-depth interviews of the postwar period. His glimpses into the days of the rebellion, complemented by the magnificent illustrations by Joseph Sherman, spark the dry but fascinating history lesson (this also does not deny that French North Africa was an occupation). imperial, even though the French considered it part of France).

The biggest compliment anyone can give Carlen and Robichaud is you’ll wish there was more of their movie. They present the true story of an incredible struggle, with all of its great tragedies, terrible losses, and happy accidents (expect an entertaining aside between Aboulker and the American soldier who sort of liberated the city on his own). It’s also a sharp reminder that Operation Torch and the Jewish Resistance are often overlooked, and talking heads are not shying away from the complicated reasons for these two omissions. Double bill with another forgotten story of French Jewish resistance, the biopic Marcel Marceau Resistance, for a fascinating glimpse into this neglected chapter in anti-Nazi history.

Shadows of freedom is available on Amazon prime and other VOD platforms now.


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Kasi Lemmons explains why “Harriet” is a “freedom movie” https://freedom-of-information.info/kasi-lemmons-explains-why-harriet-is-a-freedom-movie/ https://freedom-of-information.info/kasi-lemmons-explains-why-harriet-is-a-freedom-movie/#respond Wed, 30 Oct 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/kasi-lemmons-explains-why-harriet-is-a-freedom-movie/ When filmmaker Kasi Lemmons was invited to meet producer Debra Martin Chase a few years ago, she figured they would just have a general discussion. An actress who made her directorial debut in 1997 with the acclaimed family drama The Bayou of Eve, Lemmons remains one of Hollywood’s most under-recognized artists, despite her still strong […]]]>

When filmmaker Kasi Lemmons was invited to meet producer Debra Martin Chase a few years ago, she figured they would just have a general discussion. An actress who made her directorial debut in 1997 with the acclaimed family drama The Bayou of Eve, Lemmons remains one of Hollywood’s most under-recognized artists, despite her still strong production. His curriculum vitae is full of nuanced gems such as Caveman’s Valentine’s Day (2001) and Talk to me (2007). But at the start of the meeting with Chase, Lemmons realized that she had been summoned to speak about the making of a brilliant Oscar player: a biopic about Harriet Tubman, with Broadway luminary Cynthia Erivo attached. in the spotlight. “I didn’t have time to think about it ahead of time, so at the time I took my own temperature,” Lemmons said. Atlantic. “I felt my heart race … [which told me] it must be worth doing.

Tubman, such an important figure in American history that the US Department of the Treasury recently planned putting your face on the $ 20 bill, has never been meaningfully portrayed on the big screen before. Abolitionist born into slavery in 1820s Maryland, Tubman escaped in 1849 and went on to work with the Underground Railroad. free dozens of other slaves. Approaching this story, Lemmons took a script that had been floating around in the industry since the 1990s, overhauled it to include more specific details about Tubman’s history and personality, and focused on the younger years. of a legend often considered a shriveled icon.

“Cinema is how we understand a lot of history; it’s our most empathetic art form, and that’s how we like to look at it … [Tubman] is such a fascinating character, and yet this is the first feature film about her, ”Lemmons said in an interview, in which she discussed Harrietway to the big screen, wanting to avoid the clichés of slavery films, and the “ascending” journey of his own cinematographic career. This conversation has been edited.


David Sims: What about the existing Harriet script did you keep, and what did you want to change?

Kasi lemons: I loved that it was an adventure story starring a young character a la Harriet Tubman. But I wanted it to be about the real Harriet Tubman, you know? I think Gregory Allen Howard wrote the [original] script before major scholarly biographies were written about Harriet. In the 90s, three major biographies were written. I did seven months of researching who she was, trying to make the story as specific as possible.

Sims: The film highlights Tubman’s religious devotion and the role dreams and visions played in his life. These are things the public may be less familiar with.

Lemons: It certainly surprised and intrigued me. I didn’t realize how critical and essential [that intense spirituality] is in Harriet Tubman’s story. When I first started doing research I realized that you are really forgetting something if you try to tell the story without it, because when she talks about herself, she talks about it.

Sims: It can be difficult to sincerely commit to her beliefs – she tells people she has visions for what’s going to happen in the future – and the film doesn’t see those ideas as fancy.

Lemons: I took a stand, you know what I’m saying? I took her at her word. She spoke of it with great force and with great certainty; there is no ambiguity in the way Harriet spoke [her visions].

Sims: Were there certain Hollywood clichés about portraying slavery that you wanted to avoid?

Lemons: There was a couple. Because it didn’t feel authentic to me in this story, I didn’t want a hundred slaves in a field picking cotton and a huge plantation. The Brodess family [who owned Tubman] had money problems – they had a farm, they had 14-20 slaves, many of them from one family. So I just wanted to talk about what it was for the Ross family [Tubman’s family] back then and what it was like for the West African community in the Chesapeake region.

Sims: The standard image of American slavery that many people have is more of the Deep South, while the movie really communicates that Tubman was only a few hundred miles from the Northeast. [in Dorchester County, Maryland].

Lemons: Law. Being “sold to the South” was the horror you tried to escape. Three of her sisters were sold to the South.

Sims: In describing the Brodess family, was there anything you wanted to avoid? They’re not sympathetic characters at all, but there’s that kind of desperation you’re talking about, that their home economy is on the edge of a knife.

Lemons: When Edouard [the patriarch of the Brodess family] is dead, he is gone [his wife] Eliza in a terrible position, and she was a desperate woman. It is so inaccessible for most of us, the mental gymnastics that one would have to do to own slaves. The idea of ​​property and its value, and that if you were broke, you might have to sell someone. What would that give? How crucial was that to the way you were viewed in society? Your wealth was in people. I wanted to try to get [close] so that.

Sims: There is a mundane quality in family cruelty, which is frightening, but the Brodesses aren’t particularly cartoonish.

Lemons: This is exactly how I would describe it. It’s ordinary. They have debts to pay.

Sims: You said that Cynthia Erivo’s performance in The color purple was something that drew attention to her for the role. The power of song in Harriet is a very important part of Tubman’s leadership and power.

Lemons: This is the story of Harriet Tubman: this spirituality, which she communicated through song. It was the coded way she communicated with people, saying, “I’m here if you want to come. “

Sims: And you have Leslie Odom Jr. and Janelle Monáe in the cast, did you want a musical ensemble?

Lemons: They really were the right people for the right roles. I just happened to recruit people who are so talented they have Grammys and Broadway careers!

Kasi Lemmons, left, on set with the cast of Harriet (To concentrate)

Sims: Let’s go back to earlier in your career: you made your first film, The Bayou of Eve, in 1997. How has the industry changed since you started making films?

Lemons: When I started, there weren’t a lot of female directors, and there were even fewer women of color. We were like unicorns. We were a very small group and we all knew each other. We were swimming against the waves. It has changed quite a bit; there are a lot more women now, although we are still not at par. For people of color, what you really see is the interest in these films at the box office, which I was hoping for when I first started working. That you would have the variety of movies and genres that Caucasian filmmakers have. That’s what I thought success would measure – when we have our horror movies and our romantic comedies and our action movies, all the genres you see in Hollywood. And we approach it.

Sims: Have you had trouble setting up projects since 1997? You made a movie every six years or so.

Lemons: I spent most of my time trying to make films. I never try to make a movie. I’m still writing a screenplay or working on developing something that I hope to turn into a director position. I spend all of my time trying to move projects forward, but it’s been a tough journey. That being said, I’m incredibly lucky to have been able to make five films and still be in the business because it’s not an easy place to live!

Sims: You made another biographical film that I love, Talk to me, in 2007. Did you learn anything about the biopic genre out there that helped inform Harriet?

Lemons: Find out who the [subject of the movie] love. Because who the person liked is the story, for me. This is what they have done, but it cannot simply be a catalog of what they have done. When you find the character’s passions and who he loved and trusted, and who he didn’t trust, this is where you find the real story. In both films, I appreciate the decision not to attempt to do a cradle-to-grave biography. Both films examine a certain period of time that brings the whole [character] in sight.

Sims: With Harriet, you focused more on the early part of Tubman’s life.

Lemons: I was trying to include his family in particular. There is something very abstract about Harriet Tubman, even though you learn about her in school. We think of this old woman on a chair; we are told about his heroic deeds, but it is abstract for us. What is not abstract is what we would do for our families, and it really is his story. This makes her story more accessible – her love for her family and her desire that they be free, as well as herself.

Sims: The first part of the film is about her escape on her own and the difficulty of her journey. You make her feel like she can never do it again; it looks like such a miracle that she manages to do it at all. So the idea that she wants to go back is scary.

Lemons: It’s terribly scary, and she’s done it 13 times. She would go back there in winter, when the nights were the longest. So it was cold, there was incredible danger, and she did it over and over again. It was his job.

Sims: Were there any specific films that you thought of as a source of inspiration?

Lemons: Not really. I felt that there was not really a good composition.

Sims: This is what interests me.

Lemons: [Harriet] broke the genre: people asked me [to describe it], and I would say, “Well, that’s 12 years of slavery meets Django Unchained meets Wonder woman. “

Sims: Because movies like 12 years of slavery are steeped in the dehumanization of slavery, and while that is part of the story you tell, it is only part of it.

Lemons: Law. If I asked you to tell me what the Harriet Tubman story was about, you would say, “Well, she escaped to freedom, then she went back to free the others.” So I really focused on those words – this is a film about freedom; this is not a film about slavery. It exists in a very perilous and conflicting time in our country, but it is really about freedom and what you are willing to do for it, not just for yourself, but for others. Live free or die is a very powerful concept; Tubman repeats it over and over again. My favorite quote is, “I prayed to God to make me strong enough to fight. It’s super interesting for the times we live in – there are so many things we have to pray for to be strong enough to fight.


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Long March to Freedom by Times of India https://freedom-of-information.info/long-march-to-freedom-by-times-of-india/ https://freedom-of-information.info/long-march-to-freedom-by-times-of-india/#respond Thu, 12 May 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/long-march-to-freedom-by-times-of-india/ Story: Nelson Mandela has come a long and difficult road – how did the world join him? Review: Right now, Mandela: the long road to freedom shows you an icon in a whole new light. Many know of Nelson Mandela’s fight against apartheid in South Africa, his decades-long imprisonment, his faith in non-violence. While this […]]]>
Story: Nelson Mandela has come a long and difficult road – how did the world join him?

Review: Right now, Mandela: the long road to freedom shows you an icon in a whole new light. Many know of Nelson Mandela’s fight against apartheid in South Africa, his decades-long imprisonment, his faith in non-violence. While this film shows all of that, it also shows more, capturing a man who started out as deeply confused, full of conflict and charm, gravity and pleasure. It was then that Nelson Mandela rose from becoming a lawyer in the making in 1940s Johannesburg, full of jazz bars and pretty girls, courts and cruel cops, a friend telling Mandela he was becoming a man. to watch, in the wry retort, “Maybe I should sell tickets” – to an African National Congressman, speaking to demos and blowing up plants, as his character evolves. We then see Mandela become the Madiba that the world knows.

movie

Along the way, Mandela loses more than his freedom. Fed up with his strolls, his first wife leaves. His mother is furious as he struggles between pleasures and principles. When Mandela meets Winnie, a tough social worker, her identity becomes sharply defined. He goes from a simple seeker of joy to a fully determined fighter against apartheid. Mandela and his associates are imprisoned for life – but battling loneliness and savagery, Mandela becomes larger than life.

This fast-paced movie extends beyond an icon. Alongside Mandela, he follows the anti-apartheid movement itself, from peaceful boycotts to office blasts, to the terrible civil war and the return to peace. It captures the formidable romance of Africa, its rose-gold panoramas as beautiful as blush, its rhythms, its vibrations and its colorful tribes. And it has a fabulous performance. Naomie Harris is brilliant as Winnie Mandela, capturing her seething trauma – imprisoned and tortured, Winnie’s “Don’t Touch Me” thrills a police officer – her insistence on fierce revenge and her break-up with Madiba.

Next to it, Idris Elba’s Mandela towers gracefully, full of complexity, yet simple enough to emphasize that you can’t hate each other without hating yourself. Camera work skillfully captures individuals and crowds while the soundtrack, from jazz to Bob Marley, brings you the energy of the world to free Mandela.

Watch this – while making you laugh and cry, it takes you on a wonderful walk.


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Six minutes for freedom Film in preparation https://freedom-of-information.info/six-minutes-for-freedom-film-in-preparation/ https://freedom-of-information.info/six-minutes-for-freedom-film-in-preparation/#respond Wed, 16 Sep 2015 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/six-minutes-for-freedom-film-in-preparation/ No Escape’s John Erick and Drew Dowdle to star Six Minutes to Freedom movie MadRiver Pictures by Marc Butan brought in John Erick Dowdle and Drew Dowdle to write and John Erick Dowdle to direct a Six minutes to freedom film, based on the novel by John gilstrap. Marc Butan, Drew Dowdle, Sam Franco and […]]]>

No Escape’s John Erick and Drew Dowdle to star Six Minutes to Freedom movie

MadRiver Pictures by Marc Butan brought in John Erick Dowdle and Drew Dowdle to write and John Erick Dowdle to direct a Six minutes to freedom film, based on the novel by John gilstrap. Marc Butan, Drew Dowdle, Sam Franco and Laura Bickford are producing. Ed Fee will be executive producer

The Six minutes to freedom The film aims to deliver a gripping action thriller based on the true story of American Kurt Muse, who in 1989 was jailed for broadcasting a pirate radio station that propagated dissent against Panamanian dictator Manuel. Noriega, and the saga of his US Delta Force prison rescue. Muse is the first and only American civilian rescued by the elite special force.

“When I first found out about Kurt’s remarkable story, I was shocked that no one had written a book about it yet,” Gilstrap said. on its official website. “It’s the perfect real-life thriller. He has a team of patriots who endure untold trials for their ideals, he has one of the great villains of the modern era in mass murderer Manuel Noriega, and he has a family that is devoted not only to each other. , but for a cause higher than themselves. Finally, there’s a mind-blowing third act that delivers a happy ending to Christmas. I always thought it was a story America needed to see on the big screen. More than that, it’s a story they need to take to their hearts.

In addition to the recent No leak, along with Owen Wilson, Lake Bell and Pierce Brosnan, the Dowdles are well known for their work on As above, so below for legendary images as well as Devil for universal images and Quarantine for Screen Gems.


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The film Long Walk to Freedom is a worthy tribute. https://freedom-of-information.info/the-film-long-walk-to-freedom-is-a-worthy-tribute/ https://freedom-of-information.info/the-film-long-walk-to-freedom-is-a-worthy-tribute/#respond Fri, 06 Dec 2013 08:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/the-film-long-walk-to-freedom-is-a-worthy-tribute/ Although he already has box office records broken in South Africa, the new biopic Mandela: long march to freedom mostly got mediocre reviews, or worse. Scott Tobias from Dissolve wrote that this “dull, bright and simple film” provides “a lesson on how not to do a historical biopic. “Write in Variety, Scott Foundas called him […]]]>

Although he already has box office records broken in South Africa, the new biopic Mandela: long march to freedom mostly got mediocre reviews, or worse. Scott Tobias from Dissolve wrote that this “dull, bright and simple film” provides “a lesson on how not to do a historical biopic. “Write in Variety, Scott Foundas called him “solidly reverent, chained to the most terrible conventions of mythological biopic, and very well the sight of a white man on the “dark” continent. Even the closest to a rave, Stephen Holden’s New York Times, focused mainly on the film universally acclaimed core performance pair: Idris Elba as Nelson Mandela and Naomie Harris as his second wife, Winnie.

But a day after the great man died at the age of 95, it has to be argued that for those new to Mandela’s life and times, you could do worse than Mandela: Long march to freedom. (Much worse.Yes, the film makes the obtuse mistake of trying to cram its entire life extraordinary – and by extension the South African anti-apartheid movement and its revolutionary transition to majority rule, both of which have become almost synonymous with Mandela – in a running time feature film. And yes, he commits all kinds of little biopic crimes, from burying his star in age-old makeup to Bono’s explosion on the credits.

Where the film is strongest, however, is in its depiction of Mandela’s young adult life and the years immediately preceding his imprisonment on Robben Island – exactly the time that most Americans, accustomed to their image of Mandela as the benevolent and beatific grandfather of a nation, know the least about. There is precious small pictures of young Mandela, who seems to have been a godsend for filmmakers and for the beautiful island of Elba, allowing them to imagine the dashing young Johannesburg lawyer and skillful magnetic resistance fighter without having to compare their work to an audiovisual recording massive.

I have noticed on social media over the past few days that many people, especially the younger ones, seem shocked that Mandela and other members of the African National Congress have only been removed from the US terrorism watch list in 2008. (Really, they seem shocked that they were ever on the list in the first place.) Those who dig a little deeper seem even more shocked that Mandela, a true paragon of grace and forgiveness, also co-founded Umkhonto we Sizwe (Lance of the Nation), the militant armed wing of the ANC. For those new to history, Mandela usefully presents, albeit in a simplified and super-rationalized form, a context for these facts, describing the literal war waged against blacks by a white supremacist government, and showing how the apartheid government characterized the act of oppressed people of taking up arms in a war already done against them as “terrorism”. The movie doesn’t make these points in a subtle or artful way. But that makes them, and that’s something.

Really, however, the main reason to check Mandela this weekend is for those two performances. Elba looks nothing like Mandela, but his charisma shoots off the screen: he walks into a room and you can feel the electrons in the air reorganizing. He’s the guy anyone would follow into battle. Elba always lets you watch Mandela think about it, whether he’s struggling to keep his famous composure after learning of his son’s death in prison or calmly outwitting a squad of white government officials in negotiations leading up to the release of. Mandela.

And if the Island of Elba humanizes a secular saint, Harris achieves a perhaps more difficult feat by invoking empathy and understanding for Winnie Mandela, whose reputation was irreversibly tarnished when she was involved in multiple counts of assault, kidnapping, murder and attempted murder in the late 1980s. The film does not excuse Winnie Mandela’s crimes, but depicts the South African government’s reign of terror against her and her children, including harrowing night raids, constant harassment, subpoena at residence and, at one point, a morale-shattering 17-month period. stay in solitary confinement – this allows Harris to suggest how a bright, idealistic young woman could have been literally and systematically driven mad by a mindless diet. It’s a success – and so is it Mandela: long march to freedom, at least in the moments when it moves away from its actors and its history.


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Review of the film “Mandela: a long road to freedom” https://freedom-of-information.info/review-of-the-film-mandela-a-long-road-to-freedom/ https://freedom-of-information.info/review-of-the-film-mandela-a-long-road-to-freedom/#respond Wed, 27 Nov 2013 08:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/review-of-the-film-mandela-a-long-road-to-freedom/ Movies about great people tend to be, well, not that great. If you are still excited about the Oscar Gandhi, my excuses. I’m not. There is this rush to get it all in so that essential elements of characterization that often lie on the fringes are overlooked or ignored altogether. But don’t throw away Mandela: […]]]>

Movies about great people tend to be, well, not that great. If you are still excited about the Oscar Gandhi, my excuses. I’m not. There is this rush to get it all in so that essential elements of characterization that often lie on the fringes are overlooked or ignored altogether. But don’t throw away Mandela: long march to freedom on the scrap heap for now. The biopic plague definitely afflicts this respectful and almost canonical look at the life of Nelson Mandela, elected president of South Africa from 1994 to 1999 after serving 27 years in prison for his anti-apartheid policies. But adapting Madela’s autobiography for the screen, director Justin Chadwick (The other Boleyn girl) and screenwriter William Nicholson (Gladiator) was lucky enough to find a hell of an actor to play it. Idris Elba, the British producer, musician, rapper, DJ (as DJ Big Driis) and talented actor who won justifiable praise as drug lord Stringer Bell on Thread and as an obsessed BBC sleuth Luther, seizes the role like one possessed. It’s a mind-blowing performance. Elba might not look like the man he plays, but he gets the right details, from the singing accent and artful fire-firing imagery for the change that drives him. Actors, from Morgan Freeman to Danny Glover, have played Mandela. But Elba, 41, brings out the vigor and strength of his youth as a Johannesburg lawyer, activist, lover and first actor in the African National Congress. This is where Mandela meets his first wife, Evelyn Mase (Terry Pheto). But it’s her second marriage to social worker Winnie Madikizela (Naomie Harris) that catches our attention. Harris, who starred in Chadwick’s underrated film The first grader and played Daniel Craig’s new Moneypenny to James Bond in Fall from the sky, digs out the role, even when the script doesn’t. Winnie’s radicalization deserved more screen time. But we see his power through the ferocity and sentiment Harris brings to the role. Mandela: long march to freedom is a long slog from a movie that insists on reaching the top as a Wiki page, which leaves little room to investigate the political and personal changes that have altered Mandela’s thoughts on violence and its uses. But in those moments when Elbe shows the doubts, compromises and complications that make up a man, we glimpse a life truly lived.


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