Freedom music – Freedom Of Information http://freedom-of-information.info/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 16:27:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://freedom-of-information.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/favicon.png Freedom music – Freedom Of Information http://freedom-of-information.info/ 32 32 Top showbiz stories in 2021: tearful reunion, music returns, pop freedom https://freedom-of-information.info/top-showbiz-stories-in-2021-tearful-reunion-music-returns-pop-freedom/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 22:57:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/top-showbiz-stories-in-2021-tearful-reunion-music-returns-pop-freedom/ Actor Daniel Craig poses at the world premiere of the new James Bond film “No Time To Die” at the Royal Albert Hall in London, Britain on September 28, 2021. Image: Reuters / Toby Melville LONDON – From the return of the cinema’s favorite spy to the ‘Friends’ reunion, an array of stories have dominated […]]]>

Actor Daniel Craig poses at the world premiere of the new James Bond film “No Time To Die” at the Royal Albert Hall in London, Britain on September 28, 2021. Image: Reuters / Toby Melville

LONDON – From the return of the cinema’s favorite spy to the ‘Friends’ reunion, an array of stories have dominated the entertainment news headlines this year. Here are some of the biggest stories:

Link 25

  • After several delays, the release of the James Bond film “No Time To Die” has given cinemas affected by the pandemic a much needed boost.

Diffusion

  • Studios have revamped the schedules and in some cases the films have been released simultaneously in theaters and on streaming platforms.

Broadway, West End

  • Broadway in New York and London’s West End have reopened, although COVID security measures are in place. Live music also returned.

Taylor Swift, Billie Eilish

  • Taylor Swift and Billie Eilish won the first Grammy Awards while Beyonce became the most awarded female artist in Grammy history, with a total of 28 victories.

Chloe Zhao makes Oscar history

  • The Oscars saw “Nomadland” win Best Picture and Best Director for Chinese-born Chloe Zhao, making her the first Asian woman and the second woman to win the award.

Golden Globes aftermath

  • The American television network NBC has abandoned its broadcast of the Golden Globes 2022 after a backlash over the ethics of the HFPA group which presents the annual film and television awards and its lack of diversity. The group said it had made sweeping changes and would hold its ceremony in January.

Harry, Meghan in California

  • Now living in California, Prince Harry and his wife Meghan sent shockwaves when, in an interview with Oprah Winfrey, Meghan accused the British royal family of raising concerns about the blackness of the first child’s skin of the couple. She said the stress of life as a royal bride had pushed her to the brink of suicide.

Britney Spears freed

  • Pop star Britney Spears regained control of her personal life and money when a judge ended a 13-year guardianship after a long legal battle.

Accidental “rust” shot

  • Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins was killed when a gun held by actor Alec Baldwin fired a live bullet on the set of Western “Rust”. Baldwin said the gun exploded while cocking the weapon. The incident is under investigation.

Astroworld scramble

  • Ten people died in a stampede at Travis Scott’s Astroworld Festival in Houston. Lawsuits have been filed against the rapper and the promoters.

“Friends”, “Squid game”

  • On television, the cast of “Friends” reunited for a tearful TV show. South Korean Netflix series “Squid Game” has become a worldwide sensation.

ABBA, Adele

  • In music, ABBA released their first album in 40 years. Adele stormed the charts with the comeback record “30”. Swift released re-recorded albums to regain control of their first catalog.

Bennifer reunited, Kim and Kanye go their separate ways

  • Billionaire Kim Kardashian and Kanye West, now known as Ye, have announced their divorce. Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck rekindled their romance after nearly 20 years.

Harvey Weinstein extradited, R. Kelly sentenced

  • #MeToo-era criminal cases saw former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein extradited from New York to Los Angeles to stand trial on charges of rape and sexual assault. Singer R. Kelly was convicted by a federal jury of sex trafficking.

Deaths

  • The world said goodbye to Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts, actors Christopher Plummer, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Cicely Tyson, Helen McCrory and Olympia Dukakis, comedian Jackie Mason, rapper DMX, co-founder of The Supremes Mary Wilson, TV interviewer Larry King, Hustler magazine editor Larry Flynt, fashion designers Alber Elbaz and Virgil Abloh, and composers Stephen Sondheim and Mikis Theodorakis. Record producer Phil Spector died in prison. SM / JB

RELATED STORIES:

Daniel Craig bids farewell to James Bond: “overwhelmingly grateful”

Britney Spears wins freedom as guardianship ended after 13 years

Led by Beyoncé, female artists take top honors at socially distanced Grammys

The hottest entertainment news straight to your inbox

Read more

Don’t miss the latest news and information.

To subscribe to REQUEST MORE to access The Philippine Daily Inquirer and over 70 other titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download from 4 a.m. and share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

For comments, complaints or inquiries, Contact us.



Source link

]]>
For me, jazz is mature, the freedom of music – Shadare https://freedom-of-information.info/for-me-jazz-is-mature-the-freedom-of-music-shadare/ https://freedom-of-information.info/for-me-jazz-is-mature-the-freedom-of-music-shadare/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/for-me-jazz-is-mature-the-freedom-of-music-shadare/ Ayoola Shadare is one of the leading voices in the Nigerian jazz scene. He is the CEO of Inspiro Productions and the organizer of the Lagos International Jazz Festival. Shadare, who recently celebrated his 50th birthday at his Lagos residence, recalls his passion for music, especially jazz, festivals, the music industry and other issues in […]]]>

Ayoola Shadare is one of the leading voices in the Nigerian jazz scene. He is the CEO of Inspiro Productions and the organizer of the Lagos International Jazz Festival. Shadare, who recently celebrated his 50th birthday at his Lagos residence, recalls his passion for music, especially jazz, festivals, the music industry and other issues in this interview with BLESSING UWUMA INNOCENT

You are the CEO of Inspiro Productions. Why the choice of the name Inspiro?

The choice of the name Inspiro, is inspirational, and it is biblical. The book of Job 32.8 says, “But there is a spirit in man: and the inspiration of the Almighty gives him understanding.” So we took it from the word inspiration, and it was the Scripture that informed our departure.

Which institution is really informed about Inspiro Productions?

Inspiro Productions was created to promote and produce music or anything creative – entertainment, events and activations – when we launched it. We had a company before that called Presentations Plus that was more focused on integrated marketing communications. But Inspiro Productions was more like productions of festivals, shows, concerts, events in fact.

What made you addicted to Jazz?

For me, what got me addicted to jazz, I’ve told the story over and over again, is my late father’s love for it. But to bring it back, it’s free music. I even found out that even as a college student, my friend and I listened to a lot of jazz music, in addition to popular music. But jazz music, which when you want to differentiate jazz music from other kinds of music, they’ll say there is head music and there is body music, and jazz, as you know, it’s music while you could work, while you could do other things. And it’s instrumental music, mature music, so to speak. These are things that got me addicted to jazz, and more so when we went to the Cape Town International Jazz Festival, I saw what people used to make jazz music. These are the kinds of things that got me hooked. Like I said, it’s cool music; it’s head music. It is the music of freedom. Jazz is music of freedom. I like improvisation; I like the call and the response that exists between the musicians.

You are also the organizer of the Lagos International Jazz Festival (LIJF). What was the main idea of ​​the Festival?

The Lagos International Jazz Festival, for me, is a tourist, artistic and cultural event. This is an event that we wanted to make a signature event, an event that would also describe the city of Lagos and place it on the world map as one of the best festivals in the world. There are world jazz festivals. Our intention was to place him in this world jazz circuit. So that’s the main idea, to give our musicians a platform. Although the festival is produced locally to invite international artists and also to give our local home based musicians an international stage to be able to represent their art. This is one of the underlying ideas. And that also comes from when we went to the Cape Town International Jazz Festival in 2005. I saw the impact that this festival has had on this country, on the economy and on tourism. All that summed up is what prompted the idea of ​​the Lagos International Jazz Festival.

Is this also why over the years, you have reproduced the LIJF experience in other regions of Nigeria with several jazz concerts including the Bayelsa International Jazz Festival, Naijazz…?

Yes, I think the genre of music lends itself to travel and tourism. When you organize a jazz festival, you complement the tourism with; you invite not only national tourism but also international tourism. You have international arrivals if the festival is well organized and marketed. Thus, over the years, we have put LIJF’s experience in the organization of other jazz festivals. We did the Bayelsa International Jazz Festival. We were invited in 2013 to start this for them. We also did Naijazz, which is a platform to project our contemporary Nigerian indigenous music. Naijazz is a fusion of indigenous Nigerian music and jazz, so you could have juju, highlife, afrobeat, all kinds, fused together to make that distinct Nigerian sound.

Would you say the idea is coming true?

We do it by pushing the vision, by doing it. There are times when we can do it big; there are times when we can do it small. But the most important thing is that we do it, whether it’s big or small. The most important thing is that we are there ensuring that the dream and the vision is taken to the next level.

How did the COVID-19 pandemic and the various restrictions that followed affect your Jazz projects?

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected everyone. In 2020, we were unable to host our Lagos International Jazz Festival (LIJF), and with the closing of clubs and lounges, we were not able to have the small jazz programs that we had in various areas. We weren’t even supposed to attend festivals that we normally attend outside the country. So that affected that, but even as the year went on and we entered 2021, we realized we couldn’t just sit around and wait for Covid-19 to go down. People were starting to adjust; it’s either you adapt, or you adopt it, or you die. And then the idea of ​​having a virtual edition of LIJF came along, because the pandemic has moved everyone online. So, people are now consuming things online. Lots of businesses go online; a lot of events are online. And even when Covid-19 ends, it won’t go away. You will find that both online and offline, the hybrid event has come to stay. So, yes we affected then but we adapt and adopt and move on.

What were the challenges when you started?

Challenges like finance, good hands to run the business, get customers and keep them happy, finance the business, try to take the business to the next level, try to let people know what you’re trying to achieve do so that they can patronize you. Back then, it was difficult to get loans and support for small and medium businesses, unlike today, you can easily get a loan easily.

You celebrated your 50th birthday last week. Tell us, how do you feel about joining the golden age group?

Yes, I celebrated my 50th birthday but I don’t feel that I was in my fifties because I feel very young at heart. The feeling is the same that I was 30 and 40 years old. But thank goodness I have motivation and something to do when I wake up and I think that’s what keeps people young. I am truly thankful to God for keeping my life and there is still a lot to do now, we are going to roll up our sleeves and do more.

As a music promoter, would you consider promoting other genes in music such as hip hop, especially if the need arises?

I consider myself to be a jazz and music promoter, event promoter and show promoter. I would consider promoting other genres of music as long as it is good music. We will promote good music and encourage the evergreen genre of music, there are various music that I will not touch for some reason, but this is good, attractive and commercial and has a target that will listen to it when needed will be felt. Go over there.

Who are your favorite Nigerian musicians? Why?

When I watch a lot of guys who like music apart from my jazz musician, I like their music like Mike Aremu, Davido, the old masters, Zeal Onyia Eddy Okonta, Dr Victor Olaiya and contemporary musicians like 2face and Sound Sultan, whom I love very much (He goes through challenges, and I pray that he will come out of it successfully. Have you been embarrassed? What happened? Who has never been embarrassed before? I did but can’t really remember I can’t quite put my finger on embarrassing moments.

Without regret?

No regrets really. I love what I do, I love being in the music and entertainment industry. I like to use my God given talent to adapt to my vocation. For me, what I do is not work because it comes naturally, it is a good solution for me. . I have no regrets, happy to have taken this direction and there is a bright future and the best is yet to come so to speak.

What is your take on the Nigerian music industry today?

The Nigerian music industry is structuring because the problem we had was structure, royalties, anti-piracy and resources and these are addressed when there is a royalty collection initiative. The industry is growing and 50% of the music content on the continent, we can see our boys making the headlines making waves like Wizkid and Burna Boy winning the Grammy Awards, and they paved the way for more guys to edge so it’s a rapidly developing industry, the industry is like a gold mine waiting to be tapped and developed.






SHOCKING LIFE STORY !!!

Abuja Man reveals (FREE) secret fruits that increased his Manh00d size and lasting potency in 5 days …

CLICK HERE TO GET IT !!!


Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/for-me-jazz-is-mature-the-freedom-of-music-shadare/feed/ 0
Grove’s Radical Self-Expression Inspires Collective Freedom – Music https://freedom-of-information.info/groves-radical-self-expression-inspires-collective-freedom-music/ https://freedom-of-information.info/groves-radical-self-expression-inspires-collective-freedom-music/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/groves-radical-self-expression-inspires-collective-freedom-music/ How did you choose music as something you could do? It’s weird in terms of traveling with music because I never really thought I could do that. I was in 6th grade, they were casting for the school play Aladdin, and I didn’t know I could sing, but the music teacher chose me as Aladdin. […]]]>

How did you choose music as something you could do?

It’s weird in terms of traveling with music because I never really thought I could do that. I was in 6th grade, they were casting for the school play Aladdin, and I didn’t know I could sing, but the music teacher chose me as Aladdin. It was my first time playing. From there, I developed this unhealthy obsession with performing and music, and wanted to explore all of its elements. I did it by unconventional methods.

Who were these?

The main thing was when I was 14, I had the GarageBand app on my iPhone 3 and started playing around with it. For two years, I produced and multitracked exclusively on this. I had a Casio keyboard, the one with the “yes” sound, and I was using my phone as a multitracker, recording all these different layers to make pop tunes. I ended up showing it to someone who thought it was good on some level. They gave me a laptop through a community studio and really helped guide me through proper fabrication and production. Thanks to that, I had also been part of a rock and metal band, singing in a band, and various hip hop collectives.

How did you choose your current sound, then?

There are two really big influences on where I am now. The first is the hip hop collective I was part of, 5 Mics. Thanks to this I met two sick rappers JPDL and Griz-O, and they supervised me for everything related to lyricism and rap, in addition to singing. I have become really confident in doing this over the years we have been together. I am also part of an electronic duo called BAAST, who is me and a nasty producer called Diessa, so we were learning production together. We learned electronic dance sensibilities and incorporated more abstract and harsh sounds into them. The fusion of pop, electronic and hip hop experiences created what is happening now.

Griz-O is on your EP, isn’t it?

He does! It’s a great time to come full circle because he’s already introduced me to a few of his tracks, which were some of my early feature films. It’s a good trick to build the character.

With all this mentorship and discovery, how do you think you’ve evolved in your music practice?

I think my environments shape me a lot in terms of what I create. About two years ago I moved to Bristol and it was a start-up moment, having so much creativity and acceptance of all these different forms of creativity and constantly being stimulated by new sounds and new perspectives. It really helped me get home and shape my current path.

Bristol is very audible in your music, especially in its political nature.

I still had leftist principles before I moved to Bristol. These were formed through my friendship with Diessa. We both lived in Cheltenham being left handed like crap! Bristol definitely takes this even further. It’s a great place to connect with people at the political level and feel free to express it. In some cities it would be more contained in the way you put it, and people might laugh at that while in Bristol you might say something like ‘fuck your landlord’ and everyone is like ‘break it. the head, comrade! “

Read this next: Politics and dance music are intertwined and there’s nothing you can do about it

How was Cheltenham to you as a musician?

Previously i said i didn’t feel seen there but re-evaluated this because even though there wasn’t much stage for the music i’m currently doing or 5 mics did , there were some really key people who believed in us and wanted us to do our best. Malaki Patterson is one, which helps to run Music works. I was part of an artist development program there, and if it weren’t for people like him and the little scene that there was for the hip hop community, I would be on a path. very different. I am very grateful for the experiences I had in Cheltenham as they definitely shaped me as an artist.

Tell me about the ideas and process for ‘Queer + Black’ then.

I started writing the songs when I first moved to Bristol so a lot of it is about my life experience. I wrote ‘Sticky’ with the intention of wanting to write a dancehall-infused rave tune aimed at queer women of color. I went to Pxssy Palace for the first time after living in Cheltenham, which is a very seamless place, and Pxssy Palace, a place where I felt most out of place. “Ur Boyfriend’s Wack” is ironic, but the basement of it recovers the shame I had felt growing up in my homosexuality. The lyrics “sitting in the dark, palms against my eyes / I can’t stop thinking about the girl / No I can’t stop thinking, thinking”, that’s a literal thing that happened . But what better way to ease the shame than to turn it into a dance piece and make jokes out of it! ‘FIU’ is a production-only track and that’s just to emphasize that I also produce. I produce everything.

Read this next: Pxssy Palace and Gal-dem’s Sugar set the model for a safe nightclub

The production is lost permanently sometimes when a singer also does his own production. The tendency is to concentrate on singing.

It’s pretty crazy to have done the vocals, produced and mixed everything. I really learned so much throughout the process, but it’s just a lot to be on the shoulders of my little self! I look forward to working and collaborating with other people as it is an exciting prospect.

With dancehall inspired ‘Sticky’, what does dancehall mean to you?

Historically, in dancehall culture, there has been an overture that people would be anti-gay with, and there are specific songs that imply that you should be shot. Doing dancehall that is actively queer friendly and queer centered is important. There are so many people of color of Caribbean descent who are gay and want music of Caribbean origin and homosexuality. Doing this is really fun for me to connect the dots between Caribbean music culture and queer!

Would you say that creating dancehall-inspired tunes for yourself is a way of honoring your Caribbean heritage as well as honoring yourself?

Totally. Within the black community, there is an underlying stream of homophobia that concerns me constantly. At the end of the day, I want to be accepted by half of my inheritance. I want it to be in an open sense. For example, my Jamaican nan found out that I am gay. She is a real Jamaican Christian woman, and I first felt a sense of rejection from her as I thought, this is only a phase, do you already have a boyfriend. Literally for the past five years every phone call has been like, do you ever have a boyfriend? At this point, she says it as a joke, but at first it wasn’t. This sort of thing runs deep, and it’s not just with my grandmother, it’s with other people in the black community. I want to have a safe space within the music for myself and others to just go down and make some wine!

Read this next: Berserk dancehall: How Equiknoxx caught the world’s attention

How do you approach the creation of a song then?

It really varies. In general, I start rather on a sample basis. I’m going to find an excerpt from a YouTube video that is really fun or really poignant and quite serious. I start by incorporating that into and then I drum around that and create a feeling around that. Very often I don’t even leave the sample, sometimes I will, but I remove the sample and you end up with the feeling but without the words. When I write lyrics, I’m constantly writing a weird line here and there, so I’ll be ready – it might just be sixteen bars – to start piecing together the concepts I want to get out of it. Sometimes I can produce a whole piece by hearing it as an instrument, and then I’m like, oh, is there room for me to sing in here? It really depends, but the one based on the sample is the most common.

It’s very clear in ‘Black’ with the sample of Nina Simone. How did you find that?

I’m quite obsessed with interviews with Nina Simone. I’ve saved so many and watched them so many times. This song that I sampled has always stuck with me, it gives me goosebumps. It made perfect sense. It wasn’t even a conscious thought to include it in the trail; ‘Black’ was written the week after Edward Colston’s statue was demolished and the Black Liberation Movement was at a really solid point. It’s an appropriate empowerment tune, written to reflect the fact that I felt so empowered in my darkness within my biracial identity. This sample represented that perfectly.



Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/groves-radical-self-expression-inspires-collective-freedom-music/feed/ 0
’90s models remember starring in George Michael’s Freedom! Musical clip https://freedom-of-information.info/90s-models-remember-starring-in-george-michaels-freedom-musical-clip/ https://freedom-of-information.info/90s-models-remember-starring-in-george-michaels-freedom-musical-clip/#respond Sun, 23 Aug 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/90s-models-remember-starring-in-george-michaels-freedom-musical-clip/ George Michael’s music video for Freedom! is considered an iconic moment in 1990s modeling. Now, three decades later, the catwalk stars who made it so memorable have reflected on the lasting impact of video. Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, Linda Evangelista and Tatjana Patitz discussed the video during a conversation to mark the 30th […]]]>

George Michael’s music video for Freedom! is considered an iconic moment in 1990s modeling. Now, three decades later, the catwalk stars who made it so memorable have reflected on the lasting impact of video.

Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, Linda Evangelista and Tatjana Patitz discussed the video during a conversation to mark the 30th anniversary of their colleague John Pearson’s website, Mr. well-being.

Many fascinating ideas were revealed in the chat, including some “naughty” antics on set and how the video came to define an era. Read on for the interview highlights in the models’ own words.

Cindy crawford

“I think this video struck a chord for so many reasons. First and foremost was the song itself and the message and declaration of ‘freedom’ for George himself. coincided with the ‘birth’ of the model and brought music and fashion together in an exciting way.

“I was disappointed to find myself stuck in the tub and afterwards with a towel over my head! But you don’t argue with [director] David Fincher – even then. When I look back I think we were all presented in a way that reflected us individually.

“My favorite memory was sitting on an airplane about to turn it, listening to the song over and over again on my Walkman, trying to learn the words. I immediately loved the song and I loved it. was delighted to be included. “

Linda Evangelista

“The video captures that feeling, and that feeling is timeless. For me, the effect of appearing in the video was that I was suddenly known outside of the fashion world and in other media that was not about fashion. fashion It was amazing.

“One of my favorite memories of filming the video was George telling me that I should ‘lip-sync’ and not sing along with the track. I wasn’t quite sure what the difference was! He was so adorable. A little offbeat though as the day wore on until late at night, that’s all I’ll say… “

Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schiffer and Christy Turlington in 1996

Dave benettGetty Images

Christy turlington

“I think the video captures everyone involved at critical moments in our lives and careers that none of us could have captured at the time, except maybe George. David Fincher had worked on other iconic videos, but it was probably one of the last before his filmmaking career really took off. The song was an instant classic. Whenever it is performed in a room where I find myself, I feel my eyes turn to me.

“Linda and I were the only ones who shot the overlapping video because we had a scene together. rampant. I remember George was incredibly focused and in control of everything, but also fun in times when we just have to hang out. “

Models of the 1980s and 1990s

Getty Images

Naomi campbell

“I think it’s part of our time, all of us, including you John. It’s part of our heritage in a way, a time that we can always look back on – a happy and awesome time. Music videos were the thing and to be in someone’s music video, someone super talented like George Michael, that was a big deal!

“I remember we had the Thierry Mugler show the day before in Paris and I was the first to shoot. The show ended at 3 in the morning so I didn’t sleep because I had to take that plane at 6 am There was no Eurostars at that time. in London and I was exhausted. But I was really looking forward to it, just [relieved] that I didn’t have to learn the lyrics because I knew the song. “

Tatjana Patitz

“This represents an era of pop culture, and that was in the height of the early ’90s when the fashion, film and music industries mingled. MTV was huge back then with all the Amazing music videos. I became more recognizable in a different way I think. ”

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and other similar content on piano.io


Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/90s-models-remember-starring-in-george-michaels-freedom-musical-clip/feed/ 0
Songwriters Deserve Freedom – Music Business Worldwide https://freedom-of-information.info/songwriters-deserve-freedom-music-business-worldwide/ https://freedom-of-information.info/songwriters-deserve-freedom-music-business-worldwide/#respond Tue, 28 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/songwriters-deserve-freedom-music-business-worldwide/ The following open letter comes from David Israelite (pictured), the president and CEO of the National Music Publishers’ Association (NMPA). NMPA is the trade association representing American music publishers and their songwriting partners. Today (July 28), Israelites and other leading figures in songwriting and music publishing speak at a workshop on competition in public performance […]]]>

The following open letter comes from David Israelite (pictured), the president and CEO of the National Music Publishers’ Association (NMPA). NMPA is the trade association representing American music publishers and their songwriting partners. Today (July 28), Israelites and other leading figures in songwriting and music publishing speak at a workshop on competition in public performance licenses from music in front of the Antitrust Division of the US Department of Justice.


The Covid pandemic has changed the way songwriters write songs a lot. Songwriting is often a collaborative effort, and many songwriters adapt by learning to write in different ways.

Many more could change this year. The United States Department of Justice is currently examining important issues that could improve the way songwriters make a living, and the question is whether the music industry can adapt to ensure that songs receive their fair value from digital music services. After all, without songs, these services wouldn’t exist.

It affects all songwriters. While most people get into music because they feel an artistic vocation, there is a business side that creators need to understand in order to advocate for changes that will help them make a living from their gifts.

“ASCAP and BMI are incredibly small – and their writer members pay the price.”

Today’s songwriters face an incredibly difficult industry. For an artist, a hit song can turn into a tour, a sponsorship deal, and countless opportunities. But for those who are strictly songwriters, their sources of income are much more limited and increasingly depend on how they are paid by streaming services. The people behind the music are paid so much less than they deserve, not because their contributions lose value, but rather because of the way the antiquated rules of how the federal government decides that value, instead of the market.

The majority of songwriters’ income comes from the licensing of public performance rights, which most songwriters collect through ASCAP or BMI – and these performing rights organizations (PROs) offer huge benefits. While today there are only two PROs left, only ASCAP and BMI are incredibly restricted – and their author members pay the price because the price of songs in the ASCAP and BMI catalogs is not evaluated in such a way. fair.

These restrictions are due to a decision taken in 1941 on the mode of operation of ASCAP and BMI. Much has changed since then.


Unlike other forms of property – such as books and works of art – the work of a songwriter is not bought and sold on an open market. Instead of streaming companies negotiating with music publishers over the value of songs, they go to ASCAP or BMI for millions of works, and if a price cannot be agreed upon, a federal judge of New York decides the price. This flawed and arbitrary process resulted in royalties that are undoubtedly less than the value of the songs.

Because there are millions of songs that streaming services want to license, there is a need for efficiency, but that efficiency should not come at the expense of the value of the music. There is a way to isolate the way songs are licensed to the relatively few dominant streaming services – operated by giant tech companies – while still taking advantage of the efficiency of bulk song licensing in places like the restaurants, places and bars.

Amazon, Google, Apple, Spotify and XM / Sirius, owner of Pandora [are] all being at an advantage in their negotiations with songwriters because of archaic regulations. “

Today’s digital licensees number in the billions and billions of dollars. The vast majority of music streamed in the United States is consumed through one of the five very big companies – Amazon, Google, Apple, Spotify and XM / Sirius, owner of Pandora. These companies, both individually and collectively, eclipse not only each individual music publisher, but the music publishing and songwriting industries as a whole.

In fact, Wednesday the House of Representatives Judicial Committee to Hold Hearing with CEOs of Amazon, Google, Apple and Facebook to address antitrust concerns related to their dominance in the digital market. What do all of these giant tech companies have in common? They all have an advantage in their negotiations with songwriters because of these archaic regulations.

These companies are nothing like the nascent broadcasting industry of the 1940s, and they do not look like the general licensees of today, but they enjoy the same protections. An unintended consequence of these decades-old rules is that songwriters essentially subsidize massive streaming companies. This needs to be corrected.


Allowing songwriters to negotiate their digital broadcast rights directly with digital services makes sense and is a narrow change that will have a huge impact on songwriters. These rights are extremely valuable as streaming services attract millions of subscribers and run into billions. Yet, due to these Department of Justice restrictions, songwriters are not capitalizing on the popularity of these platforms.

The artists and the record companies are negotiating directly with the streaming companies, as it should be. Doesn’t it make sense that music publishers, who regularly represent their songwriter partners in agreements, are the ones negotiating with services that want to use their work? The Department of Justice should let the publishers do their job.

“We need to fix this system that was put in place in 1941, before streaming was possible. “

You’ve read plenty of headlines about how streaming is helping music recover since piracy devastated the business. But in many ways, in the current system, it simultaneously saves the recording industry while slowly sinking the songwriting industry due to the fact that songwriters and publishers cannot negotiate the record. fair value of songs with streaming services.

Songwriters want to keep creating. They want streaming to grow and take advantage of that growth. To enable them to do so requires a simple, narrow and fair change.

The Department of Justice is supposed to determine what’s fair, and that definitely gives songwriters the right to maximize the value of what they create, because that’s what the whole industry is built around.

We need to fix this system that was put in place in 1941, before streaming was possible. As the world grapples with so many pressing issues, music continues to be a comfort, inspiration, and career for many. You have to pay attention to it now, otherwise the creators of tomorrow will no longer stand a chance.

Music trade around the world


Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/songwriters-deserve-freedom-music-business-worldwide/feed/ 0
Harmonix’s new rhythm game offers freedom, music and corgis https://freedom-of-information.info/harmonixs-new-rhythm-game-offers-freedom-music-and-corgis/ https://freedom-of-information.info/harmonixs-new-rhythm-game-offers-freedom-music-and-corgis/#respond Tue, 30 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/harmonixs-new-rhythm-game-offers-freedom-music-and-corgis/ It is a long time since a rhythm music game has really draws attention. The genre was everywhere in the mid-2000s, with games like Guitar Hero and Rock band popping up everywhere, from bars to rehabilitation clinics to an episode of South Park. But while these games have fizzled out over the past decade, Harmonix […]]]>

It is a long time since a rhythm music game has really draws attention. The genre was everywhere in the mid-2000s, with games like Guitar Hero and Rock band popping up everywhere, from bars to rehabilitation clinics to an episode of South Park. But while these games have fizzled out over the past decade, Harmonix has never really gone away. In addition to always supporting the 2015 Rock group 4 With new DLC songs, the developer continued to release new musical rhythm games, experimenting with VR, dance and turntables throughout the 2010s. His next game, Fuser unit, learns from the past successes of Harmonix and brings the genre into the 2020s.


The notion of Fuser unit will be familiar to those who remember the game Harmonix 2017, DropMix. Also a DJ game, DropMix used a special card that reads cards equipped with NFC to play and combine music samples. An interesting concept that incorporated the lifelong 2010s toy craze, the addiction of the game to a physical board with high entry cost and collectible cards kept it from really taking off.

Related: Gamer Uses The Last of Us Part II’s Guitar For Haunting Take On Allelujah

Fuser unit eliminates one of the most charming yet frustrating things most people associate with Harmonix games: the bulky peripheral that you would need to find room for or take out of storage every time you wanted to come back into the game. only this is a welcome and inviting change, but it also corresponds to Fuser unitthe goal of. You don’t need a plastic recreation of a guitar, board, or turntable to play a recreation of someone else’s music; with Fuser unit, you are creating something that is unique to you.

Fuser unit is a game that embraces creativity and personalization on all levels. At launch, the game will feature over 100 songs, of which around 30 have already been announced. These include flashbacks like “Rock the Casbah” by The Clash and “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper by Blue Öyster Cult”, as well as contemporary hits like “bad guy” by Billie Eilish and “Good as Hell ”by Lizzo.

The songs cover a wide range of genres, from country to R&B to pop, which can be combined in surprising and exhilarating ways. While some combinations sound better than others, and it takes a bit of practice to create something that sounds as good as what you’ll hear in the trailers, there is nothing more satisfying than putting on two songs that should not go together in your mix and find that the combination works inexplicably. Some tracks, like the strings of “Call Me Maybe”, the keyboard of “I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)” and the rhythm of “Bodak Yellow” sound great with almost anything, even when combined with the vocals from “All Star” by Smash Mouth. The number of “Old Town Road” remixes that exploded last year makes so much more sense after playing with Fuser unit and find out just how versatile this song really is.

Related: 4 Video Game Companies We Really Miss

In addition to combining licensed tracks, players can also play with instruments by interacting with a grid to play different sounds. These can also be looped and added to your mix. It sounds pretty good even if you’re just playing around with the controller to see what works, but skilled players who have practiced or have a solid grasp of music theory will certainly be able to create awesome loops and solos with it.

While all of these options seem daunting, the in-game campaign acts as a tutorial, introducing new mechanics and increasing the difficulty and volume of challenges as you level up. While there is something of a narrative with NPCs to meet and learn, the developers said the game does not tell a “rise to fame” story. It’s just about being a DJ and performing on a variety of stages.

You’ll start by creating a mix one track at a time, changing things before they get stale, and achieving different goals, like playing the vocals of a country song or having at least two R&B tracks for a while. These will challenge players to change and delete tracks at the right time without overwhelming the crowd with a new song every beat. These levels, at least in the demo, can be punitive, because if you fail you will have to go back and redo everything. This includes learning the basic skills of the level. Either way, the campaign will help you learn the different mechanics you’ll want to use in your mixes. There’s also the Freestyle Mode, which allows players to hone their skills and experiment without the pressure of a crowd to impress.

Related: Steam’s New Points System Explained

Music isn’t the only place players can get creative, as they’ll be able to customize their character and scenes as well. There are tons of options here, with more to unlock as you go. Theses allow gamers to create a DJ that truly represents them regardless of race, body type, and gender identity, even offering skin color options for gamers with vitiligo. None of the options are gender related, so you are free to combine masculine facial features with feminine hairstyles and one of the different clothing options, which come in solid colors and strong patterns.

Much of the culture of the festival is the celebration of self-expression and individuality, and Fuser unit embrace that. Also note the fact that the default avatar (at least in this demo) is a black female, and darker skin tones come before lighter ones in the menu. It’s a subtle but welcome way to highlight the massive contributions of black artists to DJ culture.

While during the game you will be more focused on the crowd and your mix to focus more on yourself, you can choose from different personalities to affect the way your character acts during the performances. These styles, like joy, originality, and energy, match those of your campaign mentors, so you’ll likely unlock more of them by working with different characters.

Related: Marvel’s Avengers: Square Enix Pay Attention To In-Game Diversity

When it comes to the stages, there are a lot of things you can play around with to create an epic location for your performance. Not only can you customize effects, pyrotechnics, and time of day, but you can also choose holograms and crowd items. For example, you might want to give the crowd glow sticks for a nighttime performance and signs during the day. Much like the character options, there is a lot to customize and unlock here. You can create any decor you like, whether it’s a traditional, cool scene with dancers and fireworks, or a colorful, whimsical scene full of cupcakes and corgis.

This demo is just the start of Fuser unit. There are still dozens of songs to announce, and Harmonix has said there are plans to support the game with DLC tracks and customizations as long as there is a demand for more content. The developers also teased the multiplayer modes, which will be introduced later this summer. While no details have been announced yet, Harmonix says there will be competitive and collaborative modes that allow players to test their skills against others and work together on mixes.

With so many options available, it will be interesting to see what players can put together once in terms of music and visuals. Fuser unit spear. Game customization provides players with unique opportunities to create brilliant, extravagant, Coachella-like performances, as well as weird, meme-worthy combinations of colorful and sweet stages and weird, minor mash-ups. It may also scratch that itch for music festival attendees saddened by the fact that these types of huge and lively events that are the highlights of the summer are on hold for the time being.

Developed by Harmonix and published by NCSoft, Fuser will be released on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch in 2020.

KEEP READING: Marvel’s Avengers: What Crystal Dynamics Told Us About the Game

Shang-Chi in front of the image of Captain America from Avengers Endgame and the Infinity Stones

Shang-Chi producer has frustrating response for movie’s place in MCU sequel


About the Author



Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/harmonixs-new-rhythm-game-offers-freedom-music-and-corgis/feed/ 0
Musicians join forces with jazz greats to create “music of freedom” https://freedom-of-information.info/musicians-join-forces-with-jazz-greats-to-create-music-of-freedom/ https://freedom-of-information.info/musicians-join-forces-with-jazz-greats-to-create-music-of-freedom/#respond Mon, 20 Apr 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/musicians-join-forces-with-jazz-greats-to-create-music-of-freedom/ A pair of hip-hop legends have released a new album that mixes old classics with topical sounds. “Jazz is dead 001” brings together musicians Adrian Younge and Ali Shaheed Muhammad with some of their jazz heroes. The album features a host of big names from vibraphonist and producer Roy Ayers to saxophonist Gary Bartz. Over […]]]>

A pair of hip-hop legends have released a new album that mixes old classics with topical sounds.

“Jazz is dead 001” brings together musicians Adrian Younge and Ali Shaheed Muhammad with some of their jazz heroes. The album features a host of big names from vibraphonist and producer Roy Ayers to saxophonist Gary Bartz.

Over the past year, Younge and Muhammad have recorded the album of new songs using the original instruments and analog recording techniques used in the ’60s and’ 70s. Younge says the project was inspired by conversations. on the current expression, “jazz is dead”.

“I guess the biggest question when you hear ‘jazz is dead’ is who can say what matters? ” he says. “And you know, for us, we look at him as those people who protect art as pioneers in its progression. And that’s what we’re trying to do with “Jazz Is Dead”. “

Muhammad says the album captures “the relentlessness to exist and the ability to vibrate and unite” in these uncertain times.

“We’re more connected, I think now, than at any time at least in the past 100 years,” he says. “But it’s not a connection that has always, I think, had real depth and real consideration. And so we now really consider each other.

Interview highlights

Work with Roy Ayers

Younge: “Well, for people like me and Ali, music means more to us than it should to the average person. So, I mean, when you’re in the presence of someone like that, you know, it’s like being in the presence of a god here on Earth. He has done so much for music. He was so important in our lives with music that just being in the studio with him, not even working, just being in the studio with him was just magical.

On the source of their inspiration for the album

Muhammad:My introduction to jazz was from my grandmother, and she was a big fan of Duke Ellington, a big fan of Ella Fitzgerald, and I didn’t want any of that … I think because I was born in 1970 and the main source of my, I guess, my time was not Duke Ellington. However, when you hear bands like Earth, Wind & Fire or even Kool & The Gang that merged jazz into what has been called R&B, it kind of opens up the palette and the love story has developed. . And so the exploration went beyond just sampling to picking up instruments for me to really get my own idea of ​​what these greats were doing. It’s just a nonstop trip. So here we are with Jazz Is Dead. And this compilation just based on that, continued to be curious about the process, to be curious about the communication of music and what it means to make freedom music.

Younge: “Let’s go back. What is the first true form of musical art recognized in America? It’s jazz. OKAY. So what is the ideology of this? Well, that’s the voice of black America. Jazz embraced the struggles of black America and we used our instruments as voices. So when you fixate on the fundamental tone, adding harmonics is what makes that fundamental tone different. So we use the same instruments, but we add our own harmonics. We add our struggles. We add our prospects that have been blacklisted around the world. And that was our way of speaking at last. Do you see what I’m saying? It is therefore the foundation of jazz. And it really is something human. You don’t have to be black, you know? It’s a human thing. But it came from this black struggle.

On the song “Conexão” with João Donato, the top bossa nova

Younge: “Well, ‘Jazz Is Dead’ isn’t just a label, it’s a series of concert lineup that we’ve had. So we do these gigs with jazz legends and emerging jazz artists, and we bring them to Los Angeles, do these crazy gigs, and at the same time, unbeknownst to the people who go to these gigs, we’re recording albums with these people. So with João, we brought him here from Brazil, and part of bringing him here was not just making him play his beautiful music for people, but saying, ‘Hey let’s record a full album with you on an analog tape like you did in the 60s and 70s, and use those original instruments as well. And let’s continue those conversations you started back then, but make them more modern. “

On how this music sheds light on these uncertain times

Muhammad: “I think when musicians walk into a room together there is a lot of consideration. And we certainly hope that releasing the album ‘Jazz Is Dead 001’ right now will give people some comfort and that they will have a moment to think, wonder, you know, what’s next, maybe lose. head for a moment and then find yourself. And for me, as one of the really good examples of that is the song “Distant Mode” with Gary Bartz. For me that really highlights where we are right now, and that’s just my take, someone else may have a whole different experience, but this song for me and just the title, it’s like, what’s going on? This is how it starts. I listen to this song. It’s a question. It’s like, what? What the hell is happening? You know, and then there’s an answer. And the answer may seem sweet. It may seem uncertain. And Gary is just playing, it gets you through all these emotions.


Lynn Menegon produced and edited this interview for broadcast with Tinku Ray. Samantha Raphelson adapted it for the web.


Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/musicians-join-forces-with-jazz-greats-to-create-music-of-freedom/feed/ 0
Music of freedom | Music | Weekly Style https://freedom-of-information.info/music-of-freedom-music-weekly-style/ https://freedom-of-information.info/music-of-freedom-music-weekly-style/#respond Tue, 14 Apr 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/music-of-freedom-music-weekly-style/ In an age when human connection must necessarily occur with social distancing, music has been the salvation of many people. Gospel music, in an effort to bring hope, lift hearts, mend broken minds and remind us that we are not alone in our struggles, may not be the genre of choice. everyone, but a new […]]]>

In an age when human connection must necessarily occur with social distancing, music has been the salvation of many people.

Gospel music, in an effort to bring hope, lift hearts, mend broken minds and remind us that we are not alone in our struggles, may not be the genre of choice. everyone, but a new record from the Richmond institution, the Ingramettes, could change that.

Living on a sharecropper’s farm in Coffee County, Georgia, Maggie Ingram’s children grew up in the harsh realities of deep Southern racism.

Like the day Ingram didn’t let the five youngsters play like she always did on Saturday mornings. It turns out that she was waiting for the deacons from her church to come and shoot the man who had been lynched nearby the night before.

“We knew this kind of racism,” says Almeta Ingram Miller, one of Ingram’s daughters.

After Ingram’s husband left for work one day and never returned, people offered to take his children in as laborers – the three boys on a farm in North Carolina, the eldest daughter in New Jersey as housekeeper – but she was determined to keep her family together. To make it happen, she sat them in a circle and, using a stick from a tree branch, beat the beat while teaching them to sing. Ingram had always been musical despite the lack of training, playing an old upright piano in the barn and later at church services.

In December 1961, Ingram packed her children and traveled to Richmond after asking her pastor to contact a bishop here to arrange accommodation and work. Arriving at the Navy Hill neighborhood home on Christmas Eve, the children were treated to their first glimpse of snow. Ingram’s new job was working for civil rights lawyer Oliver Hill Jr. and his wife. Ingram quickly joined a church, and his followers began to regularly hear Ingram’s children sing with their mother.

One person impressed with their sound was Joe Williams of the Harmonizing Four. With an upcoming show with the Soul Stirrers and Dixie Hummingbirds scheduled at the Mosque Theater, Williams asked Ingram and his kids to open the show.

“After that, we got offers from everywhere,” Miller recalls. “It’s amazing, but it’s always someone in the right place at the right time to see and hear us.”

Maggie Ingram and the Ingramettes found a whole new audience when Virginia folklorist and Virginia Folklife program director Jon Lohman came to hear the band at the inaugural National Folk Festival in Richmond in 2005. “He bonded with us.” Miller says. He said, ‘We have to have you at the festival every year. “”

Mother Maggie passed away in 2015, but the band’s legacy continues with Miller taking on the role of matriarch, along with granddaughter Cheryl Yancey and stepdaughter Carrie Jackson.

“Take a Look in the Book,” the band’s new album, released on March 20 and is the first effort with Almeta at the helm. The music showcases his vision and towering vocal abilities, drawing inspiration from songs from new Appalachian sources like Ola Belle Reed, classics by Bill Withers and reworking family favorites, some of which date back to slave spirituals. For a version of Withers’ “Grandma’s Hands,” Miller added a few verses she wrote about her relationship with her own grandmother. She found out about Reed’s “I’ve Endured” when she heard him play at the Folk Festival and knew she wanted to record it. “It was like my mom’s life, so I wanted to do it in a way my mom would have.”

Produced by Lohman, a huge fan of gospel music, the goal of the record was to produce a studio album that captures the Ingramettes’ live concert experience. Too often he remembers seeing a gospel band that really turned him on live, only to be disappointed with the CD because of how watered down and processed it sounded.

“This intensity, this immediacy, this spontaneity which is really the driving force of this music has disappeared,” he says. So instead of multitracks with the members in soundproof booths, they recorded the album live at the In Your Ear Studio, with almost everything done in one take. “The group is so tight we could do it, and the ladies completely crushed it,” Lohman recalls. “Almeta’s main vocal performance is beyond epic.”

On a tour through Serbia and Bulgaria in May, the Ingramettes couldn’t walk the streets without people recognizing them.

“You would have thought we were the Rolling Stones the way the audience danced and jumped on stage,” Miller says with a laugh. On the last day of the tour, they were taken to a conservatory where a Serbian choir sang the classic “Oh, Happy Day” by Edwin Hawkins Singers for them.

However, it wasn’t as far-fetched as the group initially thought it would be.

“They told us that they love black gospel music because our struggle is so similar to the Serbian struggle for freedom,” Miller said. “Gospel music is universal.

Over the years of working with the Ingramettes, Lohman has learned never to doubt the band’s ability to connect deeply with any audience with a level of immediacy and intimacy he has never seen before. with other artists.

“Their music fits perfectly into the traditional African-American gospel genre, but their performances and recordings transcend all boundaries of religion, race, age or region,” he explains. “Their music is above all about human connection. “

“Take a look in the book” is available at legendaryingramettes.com.

Back to music number


Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/music-of-freedom-music-weekly-style/feed/ 0
A song about emotional and spiritual freedom – the Bombay Bandook music group and their team are talking about Azad https://freedom-of-information.info/a-song-about-emotional-and-spiritual-freedom-the-bombay-bandook-music-group-and-their-team-are-talking-about-azad/ https://freedom-of-information.info/a-song-about-emotional-and-spiritual-freedom-the-bombay-bandook-music-group-and-their-team-are-talking-about-azad/#respond Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/a-song-about-emotional-and-spiritual-freedom-the-bombay-bandook-music-group-and-their-team-are-talking-about-azad/ Formed in 2014, the music of the Mumbai-based music group Bombay Bandook features a soundscape that fuses raga-based melodies with a rock-heavy orchestral setup. While they started out as a competitive group at college festivals, they have performed at events and recorded extensively in the studio for the past two years. Their new track ‘Azad’ […]]]>

Formed in 2014, the music of the Mumbai-based music group Bombay Bandook features a soundscape that fuses raga-based melodies with a rock-heavy orchestral setup. While they started out as a competitive group at college festivals, they have performed at events and recorded extensively in the studio for the past two years. Their new track ‘Azad’ dropped on their YouTube channel some time ago and received a very encouraging response from listeners.

Explaining why the song was named ‘Azad’, lead singer Sannidh Shah said, “The central themes of the song and the video are emotional and spiritual freedom. The video focuses specifically on an individual character and their journey to escape their dreams and / or reality, as a means of imagining and visualizing a fairly abstract concept. We decided to name the song ‘Azad’ not only because it means freedom but also because of the way it sounds. The word is almost in an open syllabic structure and therefore correctly captures the essence of the song ”.

The song is accompanied by a well-shot video which is quite dramatic and metaphorical in nature. We see the protagonist (Shryas Porus Pardiwalla) in two completely different scenarios.

“The beauty of the story in the video is that it is open to interpretation. However, in order to give us the actors a feel for the concept, we were told to watch it like a dream within a dream. Something that you are extremely passionate about and want in life, manifests itself in the protagonist’s dream and in the same dream it is carried away and it ends up at square one, before waking up from its sleep. On these lines, we woven into the emotion, the feelings and the relationship and created this little tale. », Shares Shreyas.

The video presents him in two completely different avatars – one, in which we see him as a happy family man and the other, in which we see him in a disheveled state and running in search of what is probably gone. .

“It took a lot of character work to bring out the emotions in their purest form. From personalization to the use of emotional memory, to deep internalization and mental stimulation, I have worked with. I literally had to dig deep to find such dark emotions to express. I was exhausted at the end. I remember my director literally allowing me to sleep in his car the night before we resumed filming because he too realized how mentally, emotionally and physically trying this role was. But, what a learning experience it was! I think it was one of the best shoots I’ve ever been on, ”he adds.

The video also features Urvazi Kotwal playing the lead female role.

Speaking about her experience, she shares: “Describing or expressing vulnerability is something that all actors become aware of or find difficult at some point in their journey. We shot this video under extreme circumstances and faced several obstacles in the process. What I take away the most from this project as an actor is to be as uninhibited as possible, either emotionally or physically.

“I’ve known Shreyas since we were at school together. Working with someone you’ve known for a while makes things a lot easier. It’s easier to share points of view and come to a mutual understanding of what the scene or the director is asking for. Then there is no question of ego and arrogance being part of the equation. Knowing your co-actor in advance also cuts off nervous energy and makes your reactions more organic and instinctive.

The video, directed by Ritvik Tyagi and Rhea Talati, has a very interesting concept. It is simple and complex at the same time and makes the public think. The visuals are also very appealing to the eyes.

“A dream, as a concept, merges well with the idea of ​​an incessant search for ‘freedom’ to escape the tensions of our realities. Our motivation was to wrap a story around this thought. I realized this back when the song was still called “Patdeep” (from the name of the raga the song is based on) and the word “Azad” stuck with me. We are trying to define freedom here in a more spiritual and emotional form. As the song progresses, the dream escalates in an isolated world, devoid of everything our character desires – a calm and serene landscape with a beautiful family living in a humble little house, ”says Ritwik Tyagi.

“Bombay Bandook manages to achieve something so unique and different with every song. The moment I heard Azad for the first time, I got extremely excited and started to have ideas in my head on how to spin a video around him. It’s surprisingly addicting and such an uplifting wellness song. I fell in love with the song the moment I heard it and have felt the exact same way ever since, ”says Rhea Talati.

While the video is shown on Bombay Bandook’s official YouTube channel, “Azad” can be heard on all major streaming platforms.


Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/a-song-about-emotional-and-spiritual-freedom-the-bombay-bandook-music-group-and-their-team-are-talking-about-azad/feed/ 0
Three-day Freedom Music Fest kicks off at the Liberation War Museum https://freedom-of-information.info/three-day-freedom-music-fest-kicks-off-at-the-liberation-war-museum/ https://freedom-of-information.info/three-day-freedom-music-fest-kicks-off-at-the-liberation-war-museum/#respond Fri, 07 Feb 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://freedom-of-information.info/three-day-freedom-music-fest-kicks-off-at-the-liberation-war-museum/ The very first fundraising concert for the establishment of the permanent fund of the Liberation War Museum of Agargaon in the capital began on Thursday. The three-day concert, titled “Freedom Music Fest”, aims to create a permanent fund for the museum, which was built with a donation from local Bangladeshis. Organizers said the festival also […]]]>

The very first fundraising concert for the establishment of the permanent fund of the Liberation War Museum of Agargaon in the capital began on Thursday.


Source link

]]>
https://freedom-of-information.info/three-day-freedom-music-fest-kicks-off-at-the-liberation-war-museum/feed/ 0